Words beginning with "T"

 

Tapestry.

A tapestry is a beautiful weaving of color and meticulous design. Creating one requires a peaceful, skillful artist and the result is a lasting and functional piece of beauty. It reminds me of living life, all of us together creating an exquisite whole with our own threads of exquisite color.

Jennie

 

 

Tasty.

Lately my favorite word has been "tasty" because I can't say it without smiling (in a sort of Wallace and Grommit sort of way). Also, it's very versatile and can be used to describe things besides food such as shoes and accesories, music, celebrities, etc.

Jennifer Winston

 

 

Tempura.

My favorite word is tempura. The reason I think so highly of this Japanese word is because of all the words we get from the Greek doctrine of the four humors, who would expect one to appear on a menu in a Japanese restaurant?

The Japanese got it from the Portuguese tempÍro "seasoning," which ultimately, comes from the Latin temperare "to divide or proportion duly, to mingle in due proportion, to combine properly." The doctrine of the four humors was first described in the Hippocratic corpus of medical writings from the fourth century B.C.E. The idea was that good health was due to the appropriate mixture of bodily humors and illness was due to inappropriate mixtures. The theory was popularized in the Latin world by Galen in the second century A.D.  Most people are surprised to find out how many words in English have their origin in this obscure doctrine.

Douglas B. Gibson

 

Tennis.

Because it is my sport.

Lydia Utkin

 

 

Thersitical.

Because of the way it sounds and gives no clue to its meaning.

Ronald Davidson

 

 

Thwart.

Not as musical as many of my other favorites, thwart stands out in its brevity and force.

And every time I hear it I think of the Monty Python sketch about "tinny" and "woody" sounding words.

Rasteen Nowroozi

 

 

Tintinnabulation.

One of my favorite words is tintinnabulation. I like the way it feels when I say it. Just saying it almost sounds like the meaning of it -- the ringing of bells. One word, six syllables, so much sound and meaning.

Lynn

 

 

Tontine.

Pronounced: "TAHN-TEEN."

"A system of annuities in which the benefits pass to the surviving subscribers until only one is left."

I saw this first referenced on an old M*A*S*H episode when Col. Potter received a well-traveled bottle of brandy as the last surviving member of his World War One platoon. I believe Major Winchester used the phrase to add some pompous color to the scene to which Col. Potter nodded his rapidly aging head and remarked, "Give that man a charoot."

JC Sears

 

 
Tranquil.

It instills feelings of peace and harmony.

Terri

 

 

Tranquility.

Tranquility is my favorite word because it creates an image and feeling of calmness, a beautiful scene and absolute peacefulness.

Christopher Ind

 

 

Transmagnificanbandanduality.

It's not even really a word, and it's actually number 2 on my list, but it has a special spot in my memory. We were aboard the Delta Queen about 1929, going from Stockton to Sacramento; I was a precocious five-year old, and the Skipper took a liking to me; so he introduced me to "A big word - betcha can't say it" (It was a song that was quite popular at the time, rivaling "Constantinople") Of course I "could say anything," and the thing stuck with me ever since. It is a definite mouthful, and I have often wondered just what it could mean if it were honestly a word.

Ted Robles

 

 

Trencherman.

Trencherman is my favorite word. It means one who eats good. Since I think eating or food is one of the biggest blessings given to animals (including human beings) and I, too, am very good at it. So thatís my favorite word.

Shabbir Ahsan

 

 
Triskaidekaphobia.

First off, the sound of it. Seven syllables. Odd, that number of syllables - perhaps there is some numerological significance to that vs. the meaning of the word...

Anyway, there is a meter to it. Tris-kai-dek-a-phob-i-a. I've always loved how that word just felt as I say it.

Secondly, as obscure and little-used as it is, it is also fairly easy for someone not familiar with it to puzzle out the meaning. Especially as so many people have a problem with the number thirteen.

Ian Sokoliwski

 

Triumvirate.

My word of the moment is "triumvirate."  It's what I would consider a "good word." A "good word" is one that people don't generally use but it does crop up occasionally enough so that people know what it means in context but are nonetheless impressed by it. 

One of the hosts of the morning show I listen to on the radio uses it frequently. The host reminds me of my dad, who passed his love of "good words" on to me.

Amanda Schmitt

 

 

Trollop.

My favorite word is trollop.  It is like a wench with a little class.  If you try to use it in conversation, it always gets a good reaction.

Steve

 

 

Trust.

Trust is my favorite, because without it no relationship can truly endure.

Pat

 

 
 

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