Words beginning with "F"

 

Facetious.

I like the sound of the word. However, I never, well hardly ever, hear this word spoken, so the sound is mostly in my head. I love the fact that it uses all the vowels in alphabetical order. Even "y" if you add "ly" to the end of it! Any other language have a word like that?

Anna Barbour

 

 

Facetious.

Describes me to a "T."

Theresa

 

 

Facilitate.

I like this word because it means making things easier; that to me means making life better. I like being a facilitator; that is I like making things easier for others. I always believe there is an easier way of doing anything and I am always looking for it. Hence my liking of the word facilitate.

Lorna Callender

 

 

Fardel.

I like fardel. It's a nice old word (1300), used in Hamlet's soliloquy ("Who would fardels bear, To grunt and sweat under a weary life;"). Mostly it means a bundle or burden; as a verb it means to divide into fardels, as to divide a camel's load into two parts for balance. But mostly I like it because it makes such a satisfying curse: "Oh, fardels!"

Bob Ide

 

 

Father.

My favorite word is father. Although I wish I could use it more often. I hear other people saying it. So I say it to myself to make me feel better. It means a lot to me. It is my favorite word because I cannot use it anymore, although I use it in my writing. It just comes out so beautiful and Old English. Father is my favorite word.

Nurije Paljevic

 

 

Felicitations.

Uttered in the low voice and measured tones of an earlier era, felicitations suggests a gentility and kindness of spirit that probably never existed in any time or place. No matter, its sibilance is more pleasing to this ear than "hey there you guys" or "lotsa luck on that hernia operation."

P. McCullough

 

 

Ferblungen (phonetic).

It is a Yiddish word meaning something like "disoriented" or "all over the place." I like the word because it sounds like what it means so if you are feeling ferblungen it gives you some satisfaction to use the word and know it will somehow be understood.

Lori

 

 

Fere.

An old word that meets a modern need. It means a spouse or companion. Who needs POSSLQ, or "boyfriend" with "air" quotes?

Bruce Miller

 

   

Fiducial.

I put myself through college by working at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory as a “scanner.”  Briefly, sub-nuclear particles were propelled through the hydrogen bubble chamber and photographed at the moment of impact. Scanners would project the film onto a large table and scrutinize it frame by frame, looking for "events," or bubbles going in one or more directions, indicating a sub-nuclear interaction.  We would note the frame number, then use a device not unlike today’s computer mouse, first clicking on a large X etched into the chamber’s corner, then clicking again where the "event" occurred. The X was called the fiducial and was the reference point to tell the computer where the interaction occurred in the film. I knew its root was the Latin word for faithful and loved the thought of something unchanging and always there.  As a bonus, it sounded pretty, so it became my favorite word.

Nina Kramer

 

 

Floccinaucinihilipilification.

Floccinaucinihilipilification is my favorite "big" word, and yes it is a word! If I remember correctly, it means: The classification of something as being small or insignificant.

Yvonne Hugli

 

 

Fop.

I love the short and explosive nature of this word. It's so brief but conveys so much. It also sounds like a little more than just an insult -- has a bit of nastiness to it, like a bad word. I'm working hard to find more opportunities to use it.

Ashley S. Moore

 

 

Forbidden Love.

Actually they go together: forbidden love. One cannot stand without the other. As a young teen I always heard "that sort of love is forbidden," as a adult my thoughts of love for a special person was "forbidden"; prior to marriage, it was "forbidden!" Now I write short stories on "forbidden love." Even poetry. Prose. Epic tales of it. These are my favorite words.

David Billman

 

 
Forgiveness.

Forgiveness, because it is one of the two "F" words, (the other being free), that is like a miracle when practiced.  It is truly the key to happiness.

Alan Dolit

 

 

Forty eleven thousand times.

My mother used this word as "I've told them forty eleven thousand times not to do that." Mom is English, maybe it is an old English phrase? I use the phrase and some people question the figure and say, "How many times is that?" I don't know, I guess 440,000 times.

Panchita N. Beer

 

 
Formication.

I stumbled across this word in Samuel Beckett's "Happy Days" where it wasn't used in a sentence but simply as a single word utterance. There aren't many words I encounter in reading that I have absolutely no familiarity with, but I had to run to the dictionary for this one to discover that it means "the sensation of ants crawling on one's skin." Certainly not a 'happy day' for anyone having to apply the word personally or to friends. It did seem to summarize and illuminate the play, at least for me, and that's why I like it -- a great writer infusing a word with more than its definition. I doubt that I will encounter the word again except in some medical, psychological or scientific treatise; or in a viewing (or rereading) of "Happy Days."

Barney Johnson

 

 

Free.

My favorite word is "free."  It has a multitude of meanings and uses -- all of them enlightening and energizing. It even sounds like its essence, as in "Whee!" Whether a person runs across it as in getting something for nothing (which has a big appeal to a lot of folks), or as in having no obligations (which most people wish for), or as in the socio-political sense of liberation and choice (which sadly so many people in our world may never experience), free has to put a smile on the face, a lift in the step, and a bounce in the heartbeat.

Hal Mason

 

 

Fricative.

My favorite word tends to vary depending on mood, but I am deeply in love with fricative. Go figure, maybe because it sounds like what it means? Maybe when I lecture on language development it allows me to sound like I am swearing at my students and get away with it? I don't know, but it is my favorite word at the moment.

Ellen Wright

 

 

Friend(s).

I have only a few of these, but a lot of people will say that they have a lot of "friends" but in those "lots" of people, there are only one-three of them that are "real" friends.

More and more I hear this word used to define an acquaintance and the word "Friend" is not as sentimental as it should be. It used to be a strong form of love and care for a person close to another.

Mrs. Cartagena

 

 

Frivolous.

The word has a lovely sense of motion as you say it -- picking up speed towards the end as if it hadn't the time to stick around.

I know this word often has a negative connotation as light-minded or something to be disregarded, but to me it means all of the little things/experiences in life that stay as little memories to be savored. I won't remember the sales figures from this month by the end of the week - but I will remember the time we diverted to go see the world's largest ball of twine just to take a funny photo, or the time we all took a long lunch to go shopping for vintage handbags.

Some of the best family or couple times are full of the frivolous -- and I pity the person who hasn't enough of this commodity in their lives!

Aislina Graham

 

 
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Back to main page