Words beginning with "D"

 

Dandaragan.

Though its a country town in WA and therefore not scrabble-allowed, I've always loved saying it.

Plantagenet -- also a word I love to say.

Erin Paul

 

 

Dang.

Dang is my favorite word.  Its meaning is similar to damn but sounds so much better and has a catchy sound to it.

Kaz

 

 

Dearth.

I love to read -- I can remember sitting in my dad's big chair with a leatherbound copy of Dante's Inferno and trying to puzzle out the meaning of all those carefully imprinted symbols and how they could possibly relate to those strange pictures. I was ecstatic, when in kindergarten I started to see how it all worked!  I enjoy so many words, and also like a good challenge. When I first heard this, I couldn't imagine what it meant. I began to assume that perhaps I had a dearth of vocabulary.

Diana B.

 

 

Defenestrate.

I can't remember when I first heard it, but I do know I had to go and look it up immediately. Such an elegant and specific word, you wouldn't expect the possible violence and anarchism of the act it describes. It's surprising how often you can drop it into conversation too!

Andrew Cameron

 

 

Deliquescent.

For naturalists, the word describes the way some tree branches erupt from a trunk: not alternating or spiraling around the central pole (as in a conifer), but "melting away" from the core. Read it again and you can feel the melting in the root and prefix. It imbues apparently stationary trees with much movement and activity. They don't just stand there; they deliquesce!

Graham Charles

 

 

Desideratum.

This is my favorite word because it has romantic notions in its meaning and also because it's used in one of my favorite songs by one of my favorite artists and also used in a song by my fiancÚ, and our love of words brought us together in the first place.

Belinda

 

 

Desirable.

My favorite word is Desirable, because when my beloved purrs this word in his dark chocolate voice, I go weak at the knees...

Clara

 

 

Detritus.

My favorite word is detritus, meaning the strewn-about pieces of matter that have been broken off from the whole. I think it has a nice sound. I have only heard it used in conversation once by a well-educated Englishman.

John Vowell

 

 

Digress.

I like it because, when I use it, it has a sarcastic lilt to it.

Will

 

 

Discombobulate.

I heard this word in a video game spoken by a cat. I just love the way it sounds.

John Adams

 

 

Disingenuous.

I like disingenuous because it is one those words that doesn't mean what you first thought it meant and in its real sense gives you so little opportunity to use it; perhaps the people I associate with are just to upright and honest or maybe I just have not caught them out!  However, the great glee and joy that abounds when finally the opportunity arises to use this gem is something glorious and not something that you can get from just any old word.  The joy is even greater when you realize the person on the receiving end does not know what it really means and smiles as they edge away to find a dictionary.

Richard Riley

 

 

Do Not Iron.

No explanation necessary!

Pat Champion

 

   

Doubt.

I would put forth doubt as my favorite word, and not just because it contains my favorite silent letter. So many of the world's problems originate with people who are so certain that they know "the truth."  Equally troubling are the masses who are ready to believe everything they are told. Doubt is a healthy thing, and a word that should get more time in the spotlight.

Kevin Reitz

 

 

Dunderhead.

I find this word to be useful in describing some of the people I have to deal with on a daily basis. It is a polite, and usually an arcane word, when accepted by the recipient of this description.

Whenever I say to them (while smiling), "You're such a dunderhead". They assume it is a compliment, thus causing me to smile inwardly.

Marjorie Ervin

 

 
Dysdiadochokinesis.

Dysdiadochokinesis is my favorite word. While learning about the treatment of divers with the bends, a colleague taught me to assess the diver for this anomaly. It is the inability to execute rapidly alternating movements.  It is most readily demonstrated by asking the patient to pronate and supinate (turn over their hand and back) an arm at speed.  Sluggish or clumsy performance of this movement indicates a lesion in the cerebellum.  In a diver's case this is an air bubble trapped in the brain.

Rob Timmings

 

 

Dysphemism.

I first saw this word in a exposition from a QC about staff shortages in the Army Reserve. It was such a delightful way of standing back and saying with aplomb "don't panic."  I use it whenever possible to indicate my pretension and supposed education. Perhaps I will, one day, grow into its use.

David Paterson

 

 
 

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